Do I really need to stake my tomatoes?

Staking tomatoes does take time and some expense, however, the benefits are earlier, larger and healthier fruit. Maintaining the plant upright allows more sunlight to reach the leaves, better air circulation to keep diseases from spreading and provides easier picking access. If your tomatoes are the bushy determinate type, staking might not be as necessary. Indeterminate types that continue to grow through-out the season can sprawl all over the garden. Tomatoes lying on the ground may rot and suffer attacks from pests.

While sturdy cages are great for determinate plants, indeterminate tomatoes need taller, sturdier cages, pruning or trellising to carry the size and weight of the plants. Be sure to stake the tomato soon after planting to prevent damage to the root system.

Does companion planting really benefit my garden and how should it be done?

The effectiveness of companion planting in the garden is really up for debate. Evidence of benefits is more anecdotal than scientific. Perhaps the best example of effective companion planting is the use of marigolds which seem to repel pests, both the flying kind and the four-legged kind. Planting flowers among vegetables also attracts beneficial insects and pollinators that contribute to healthier and better producing plants. Planting basil around tomatoes repels aphids, white flies, spider mites and hornworms. Basil is also said to improve tomato flavor and pollination. For more information on companion planting check the library for “Carrots Love Tomatoes”.

How do I protect my plants from adult Japanese beetles?

Adult beetles emerge in late June and early July in central and northern Illinois. The beetles feed on a wide range of plants, preferring smartweed, grape, basil, raspberry, rose, crabapple, linden, and willow. The beetles can be controlled by handpicking or using insecticides. Because the beetles are numerous and cause damage for about six weeks and most insecticides last two weeks or less, repeated applications are necessary. Vegetable and other crops can be protected with row cover. Studies have shown that landscapes with Japanese beetle traps are likely to experience

If you have been seeing red, white, and blue rockets scattered here and there around Marengo, and you like fireworks, you may want to drop some money into the rocket. They are the work of a group of volunteers who have missed having fireworks in Marengo. Their intent is to fund a fireworks display at no cost to the city. “A bunch of volunteers are trying to do a good thing for Marengo,” said Mike Miller. “We haven’t had any fireworks in Marengo for a few years and we miss them. We are planning to have live bands and a beer tent behind Trio Grill.

“Jeff Seevers came up with the plan and we put in a lot of work making the canisters. We fabricated, well, mainly Jeff Seevers did the work while I helped, five rocket collection boxes. We are putting them around town to raise money to fund a fireworks display behind the Trio Grill on June 30.

“I am a 1st ward alderman on the City Council and I spoke to the mayor about our plan. Technically, this will be a city sponsored event, but the city will not be paying for it. It will be paid for by donations from the citizens of Marengo. Gene Lindow has been helping quite a bit and UniCarriers has made a sizable donation. We have or will have canisters at places like City Hall, Trio Grill, the Farmers Market, Sullivan’s… They can be moved around.

“We are hoping to set this up as an annual event year after year. Next year, we would like to get schools’ art departments to paint the canisters.

The Spot was voted this year’s Best of the Fox by Northwest Herald readers for the “Best” Video Gaming and “One of the Best” Karaoke.

     

I took my Kindergartener to his first play last month, put on by the local children’s theatre CAST. It was a great time. We jumped at the chance to see Peter Pan so close to home, at our local high school. The price was reasonable at ten bucks per ticket, and we scored front row tickets by purchasing early. We have never been theatre people, and I have seen limited plays in my life. After seeing this play, I realize what a shame that is.

Ryan was so excited to go on our “date” and see the play. He did not know what to expect, and neither did I. We grabbed our front row seats and the magic began. Peter Pan was played by a - gasp! - girl. And played so darn well, you could barely tell.

Smee was also played (very well) by a female cast member. Captain Hook was a tall, amazingly funny male actor who was kind enough to chat with my guy after the show in full character and snap a picture. Every kiddo, from the smallest mermaid to the loudest Lost Boy, was exceptional. Choreography was amazing, set was on point. It was such a surprising treat for us, and we will surely be back for more.

As my kids get older in our little town, it is such a joy to see them participating in community events and activities, from free Park District events to reasonably priced sports teams with awesome coaches. Marengo Union Times usually updates our family on what is coming up, and I look forward to finding out more about the goings on in our town each month.

Parents, I highly recommend checking out and getting involved in something that interests your family! There is bound to be something that suits you. As we sample more and more activities, we continue to be pleasantly surprised and more engaged within the community. We cannot wait for the next play and starting soccer and t-ball this summer. Hope to see you guys there!

Congratulations to the Zion Lutheran Varsity Boys’ Basketball team for taking 4th place in the nation at the Lutheran Basketball Association of America’s Nationals! Zion was one of 32 teams across the country invited to participate in this prestigious national competition as a result of their great achievements (an undefeated regular season, conference champions, and a 3rd place finish at state). Nationals were held at Valparaiso University March 22-25th. Led by head coach, Dave Wascher, and assistant coaches, Scott Shepard and Hunter Simonini, the boys worked hard and won 3 out of 5 games, losing only to the pre-tournament #1 seed and the eventual national champions. In addition, the boys broke the Zion school record with their 4th place finish and Matthew Volkening made the All-Tournament team for Nationals. On Monday, April 9th, the team was recognized by the Marengo City Council. The boys were presented with certificates of achievement. Congratulations, again, to the Zion Panthers!

Troy Umland admits he’s a “walking talking advertisement” for Umland’s Crunchy Cheese Bites wherever he goes. Remember the name of this delicious snack, because it will show up in local stores very soon. And you will know the Marengo connection.

Troy and his wife Barb have lived in Marengo since 1998. They have four kids—12-year-old Julio and 8-year-old triplets, Grace, Faith and Hope. Troy didn’t plan to become part owner of a company making snacks, but when he had the chance to partner with his brother Greg, Greg’s wife Louanne and their son, Taylor, of Carlock, IL, he signed on and brought his 30 plus years of experience in the consumer goods industry to the enterprise.

Greg Umland discovered a new technology for drying food that is energy efficient, faster and produces a more flavorful product. He used the technology to produce “Umland’s Pure Dry 100% Natural Cheese.” Troy joined his brother and family in 2017 and helped rebrand the product. It is totally cheese, not a “cracker type product posing as cheese,” Umland explains, so they named the snack Umland’s Crunchy Cheese Bites. This name truly describes these delicious bites of cheese that come in three flavors: Gouda, Cheddar and Pepper Jack.

Umland entered the product in a contest sponsored by Peapod, searching for the next best new foods. There were 100 entrants. The Cheese Bites made it to the top 18, making them part of an episode of ABC7’s “Windy City Live” show. On that show a panel selected a homemade pasta as the winner. The runner up: Umland’s Crunchy Cheese Bites! Peapod likes them so much they are interested in carrying them.

Greg Umland and his family continue producing the snack in Carlock. Troy Umland of Marengo pursues possible markets for the product in the Midwest, while continuing his full-time job and his life as a husband and father. “Balancing work and life is the challenge,” Umland states. If he can succeed in bringing this very healthy, incredibly delicious snack to local store shelves we will all benefit from his challenge. Watch for it and remember the Marengo connection.

Baggage car 1236 was built in Chicago by Pullman 110 years ago Union, IL – You may know someone whose basement is full of trains, or at least someone who has a few items of train paraphernalia around the house. But the ultimate prize for any train lover is an actual train. This spring the Illinois Railway Museum (“IRM”) in Union, McHenry County, Illinois is making that a real possibility. The museum is making one of the railway cars in its collection available to a good home. The railway car in question won’t fit in your basement – in fact, it may not even fit in your driveway. It is a wooden baggage car from the Chicago & North Western Railway numbered 1236. It was built in Chicago by the Pullman Company in 1908 and is roughly 70’ long, weighing in at about 99,000 lbs. The historic car, which is built mostly of wood, was once used on Chicago & North Western passenger trains to carry passengers’ luggage and small express freight shipments. It was acquired by IRM in 1964 and for a time was used to store spare parts for other trains at the museum. More recently it was employed as a storeroom for the museum’s gift shop. The railway car is mechanically complete but the interior is partly removed – perfect for someone looking to create a unique shop, club room, or getaway. Another identical baggage car owned by the museum is being retained and is currently on public display as an historic artifact. “This car may be surplus to our needs, but it has stuck around for 110 years so far and we are hoping that someone can provide it a good future so that it’s still around in another century,” stated Paul Cronin, IRM General Manager for Collections. Baggage car number 1236 is being offered as-is, where-is at the museum’s property. Serious inquiries can be directed to Paul Cronin, IRM General Manager, and the baggage car is available for inspection to any museum visitor. IRM is open daily until September 16th and weekends through the end of October.

There will be an Old Fashioned, “base ball” match at Village Hall Park off Barreville and Ames roads in Prairie Grove on June 10 at 2 p.m. Civil War-era game pits the McHenry County “Independants” against the Grayslake Athletics. Elmhurst History Museum Director Dave Oberg will umpire and emcee, explaining the rules and teaching the audience to cheer and jeer in proper 19th -century fashion. Free.

The Marengo Indians opened the defense of their Class 3A Illinois High School Association state title with two straight wins, before dropping an Apr. 2 game to Sterling. They are currently own a 9-2 record, following an Apr. 24 non-conference loss to Harlem, 3-0. These tune-ups on the way to the post-season will help later this this month, and in June.

“We are trying to get a lot of live, and front-toss, pitching in practice,” said Indians head coach Dwain Nance. “That way, our kids are seeing a lot of pitches and learn to recognize their best and worst pitch... being disciplined at the plate is very important. We schedule some very difficult games for a reason. It prepares us for the post-season. In softball, everyone makes the post-season, so it’s good to challenge yourself.”

The 2017 team finished with a 35-6 record including a trip to East Peoria, IL for the championship rounds. The Indians pulled out a 1-0 late-inning win June 9 against Nazareth Academy in the semi-final game, and a 2-0 victory in a similar fashion against the East Peoria Red Raiders June 10, for the title. It was the second top-slot finish in the program’s history, complementing other regional and sectional titles, all under Nance.

“Obviously, winning the state championship (last year) was a huge highlight,” he said. “But one thing I noticed was that team played together, and got along with each other. They built long lasting relationships with each other…that team was close. It’s fun to watch that happen.”

The celebration was somewhat abbreviated, hours after the team got home from Peoria, as a June 11 gas explosion, during the early morning hours, left four homes destroyed, damaged nineteen others, and rendered more than fifty other residences inhabitable, on and around, the 7th Circle neighborhood. Families were left homeless, and some residences are still under repair.

Nance recalled hearing the explosion, and driving there. He said there was relief that the injuries were not more severe and felt badly for the families whose homes were ruined. Team member Anna Walsweer, and others, helped out at the Marengo (Area) Out Reach Enterprises (MORE Center), a non-profit organization providing emergency assistance for needy individuals and families in the Marengo and Union area.

The community pulled together. A benefit wrestling tournament was held later in the month for Indians coach Tim Keefer and his family, who were left homeless by the blast. Nance said, “The Marengo community is a great one,” Nance said. “It does a great job of supporting each other, and it’s a great place to coach and teach at.”

Providing a sports outlet for girls, especially mentoring the game of softball, is important to the fabric of the community, in addition to supplying the Indians teams with potential players when they pass through high school.

 “Our assistant coaches, Rob Jasinski and Wayne Montgomery, and myself, are on the Marengo-Union Girls Softball Board, and Wayne (Montgomery) is the president,” he said. “The high school and MUGS have a great working relationship, and everyone is on the same page. It is a wonderful situation for our program, being in the position we are in. A lot of the softball parents are also on the board, such as Wendy Aubry, Aimee Ritter, John Turn, and Todd Christopher.”

The Indians play in the Kishwaukee River Conference, founded in 2016, on the heels of Woodstock and Woodstock North’s joint 2013 announcement of leaving the Fox Valley Conference to form a new one. Teams from the Big Northern Conference, including Marengo, also joined the aggregation. The powerhouse teams representing all the athletic programs at the various schools translates into one tough schedule.

“For softball, Burlington Central always plays us tough, and the conference championship has been won, either by them or us, for the past 12-15 years,” said Nance. “However, the KRC will be rough this year. All the teams are improved, and bring back some quality players. There’s a lot of good pitching in the conference, and it reminds me a little of when I first got to Marengo…the Big Northern Conference was a tough softball conference.”

In 2017, Marengo was the last team standing in the Class 3A division, from Mc Henry County and in the state. By the end of May, the team will be starting its trek into the post-season, and a possible repeat.

Scoreboard

(Apr. 25) Girls Soccer: The Indians lost 6-0 to the Johnsburg Skyhawks. (Apr. 24) Baseball: The Indians (4-9 Overall, 2-5 KRC) dropped a 9-4 game to the Johnsburg Skyhawks. Jake LaSota went 2-3, and Matt Merande picked up 2 RBI. (Apr. 24) Softball: The Indians lost 3-0 to Harlem, with Haley Minogue pitching all 7 innings. Hannah Secor and Grace Houghton each went 2-3.

There’s a new store in town, replacing a loved old store. Andy’s Paint and Paper has been at 21714 W. Grant Highway in Marengo for 27 years, until owner Andy Nowakowski retired and sold the business. Brian and Gemma McGivney, long-time customers at Andy’s decided to buy the store and tweak it a bit. They reopened as Gemma’s Paint With Color at the same location on April 2.

“This opportunity fell into our laps, and we decided to take it,” says Gemma McGivney with enthusiasm. She is a trained color consultant and interior decorator. Her husband Brian is an “IT guy” who will manage the business end of things. The two are parents of three grown kids and have lived in Marengo for 14 years.

The store will remain a Benjamin Moore supplier. You will see familiar items as and a lot of new ones. “We are carrying many more painting supplies and sundries,” Gemma explains. They will also offer custom window treatments.

More surprising is the store’s expansion into a whole new line of products for swimming pools and spas—chemicals and maintenance supplies. They have even installed a sophisticated water tester for use by their regular customers.

The McGivneys are offering competitive prices and personal service. They hope you will remember the value of shopping locally.

News

Take Advantage of August’s Abundance

Take Advantage of August’s Abundance

Each spring as plants and seeds go into the soil, there is much anticipation of the bounty that will arise from the...

Read more
Union Boy in Motocross Nationals

Union Boy in Motocross Nationals

Robert Lopez has qualified for the Motocross Nationals. “Would you like to cover this?” the Marengo-Union Times editor asked. We’d gotten an e-mail...

Read more
Wrestling Scholarship Awarded

Wrestling Scholarship Awarded

O’Neil Swanson was awarded this year’s scholarship from Marengo Youth Wrestling Club. Pictured are Brian Wroble (president of MYWC), O’Neil Swanson and...

Read more